Getting towards the end – but where is it?

I’ve had a good week. At first I didn’t think I had, as I only managed to write on five days – the rest of the time was taken up with writing last weeks blog post. Every writer needs reviews, but I find them difficult, especially if I have problems with the book, even more when I seem to be in a minority with that view. Good books are easy to review.

But back to this post. Last week I wrote (pause for dramatic drum roll) 7,822 words, comfortably over the 7k  have set myself each week. In addition to that, the total for book 2 (1st draft) is just over 97k (out of 90k!) and I hope to finish this week. Or have I already finished? I think I have mentioned this before here – if you have read it, that ending did change, slightly.  Anyway, last week I wrote a scene, then sat back and thought “That would make a very good ending. Pity it’s not actually The End.”

Why isn’t it the end? Well there is that big dramatic (romantic?) scene I have been thinking about for months. I’m really looking forward to writing it – you nearly didn’t get a post this week because I’m so desperate to get on with it. But perhaps I am too keen on it; should I kill my darling? After all, I am writing a series, perhaps I could leave it until the beginning of book 3.

There is something else to think about. I recently read a post by Alison Morton on the Neetsmarketing blog about Marketing a Book Series Among a lot of helpful advice, one of the things she said was:

“Firstly, ensure your books can be read as standalones, i.e. that each story is properly resolved and does not end on a cliffhanger.”

If I abandon that final scene, I will be leaving a major character at death’s door, not knowing whether they are alive or dead. I couldn’t do that.

But. When I was talking to someone about that, they reminded me of “Star Wars” – the original films. At the end of “The Empire Strikes Back”, Han Solo is left frozen in carbonite. You have to wait for the next film, “Return of the Jedi” to find out if he survives. It was released three years later – a long time to wait.

Han Solo – waiting

Are films different? How much of a “cliffhanger” do you need to encourage readers to buy the next book, but not frustrate someone who has bought one book.

Any ideas?

Finally, did I tell you I wrote more than 7k words last week?

Book Review – Dunstan

In the year 937, King Æthelstan, grandson of Alfred the Great, readies himself to throw a great spear into the north. His dream of a kingdom of all England will stand or fall on one field and the passage of a single day.

At his side is Dunstan of Glastonbury, full of ambition and wit, perhaps enough to damn his soul. His talents will take him from the villages of Wessex to the royal court, to the hills of Rome – from exile to exaltation.

When I noticed this book, by Conn Iggulden, was to be published on 4th May, I was worried. I have written a book and am looking for a publisher. It starts in 937, Dunstan appears in it, although he is not the main character. How would it affect my own book? I had to check out the opposition.

As you can see from the blurb, the book is about Dunstan, Abbot of Glastonbury, Bishop of Worcester and London, ultimately Archbishop of Canterbury – and Saint. He lived through the period when England moved from a collection of minor kingdoms to the country it is today. Some might say this process began with Alfred and completed by his grandson, Æthelstan. Dunstan played his part by reforming the church.

It takes a strong man to do this and the Dunstan we see in this book was certainly strong. I was reminded of the Thomas Cromwell we have met in the books by Hilary Mantel. Both are men from the lower orders. Both achieve high position by their own intelligence and hard work. Both are unpleasant characters who tell their own stories. Mantel’s Cromwell, however nasty, is understandable, even, at times, sympathetic, that is the genius of her books. In this book Dunstan is just plain nasty.

It starts, not in 937, but three years earlier, as the thirteen year old Dunstan is taken to Glastonbury by his elderly father. At the same time his younger brother Wulfric also enters the monastery, but far from looking after him, Dunstan despises his brother. Why? Because he thinks he is weak and Dunstan considers anyone weaker than him is there to be used. Despite Wulfric’s later business success, which mystifies Dunstan, he must drop everything to do his brother’s bidding.

Dunstan rises. He tells us it is because he is lucky to be in the right place at the right time, but we are left to imagine the things he does not mention. The book covers his life and the reigns of seven kings. Dunstan is not interested in battles or even politics, just in how much money he can raise to complete his projects, the Abbey at Glastonbury and Canterbury Cathedral, which he believes will be his legacy. He was an interesting man, with a great interest in science and engineering, never happier than when working in his forge. It should make him more human, but he is too arrogant of his abilities. Everyone is there to serve him. One sentence sums up his attitude: “I have always forgiven my enemies, but only when they have been punished.”

As every hero needs a flaw to make him human;  a monster needs a spark of humanity to gain the reader’s sympathy. The Dunstan revealed in the book has none.

I should rejoice that a ray of light has been shone upon this period. The late tenth century has been comparatively neglected, perhaps because of the lack of major battles, and Dunstan’s is a story that has been waiting to be told. I have read a lot of books set in the Anglo-Saxon period. Most, good or bad, give a flavour of life at that time, this one doesn’t. It could almost have been set in any period.

The author prides himself on the depth of his research; the first person he thanks is his researcher. So why are there so many errors? At one point someone arrived in a pony and trap – yes, there were horses and various types of cart but the expression suggests something other than this period. Elsewhere, someone is searching the crowded streets of Winchester for a girl. He cannot spot her bonnet. Bonnet? Is this a time slip novel and Jane Austin has found her way into the tenth century? Later someone, still in Winchester, looked “up the high street to the cathedral spire in the distance, dominating the city.” Winchester does not have a spire today and, I must admit, I had to look it up, doesn’t appear to ever had one.

I was particularly interested in one event – the death of King Edmund. It forms an important part in my own book. It is described in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle.

A.D. 946. This year King Edmund died, on St. Augustine’s mass
day. That was widely known, how he ended his days: — that Leof
stabbed him at Pucklechurch.

There are not many exact dates, or even places, for events that can be identified during this period. St Augustine’s day is 26th May and Pucklechurch is easily found. So why, in this book, does this important event take place on All Hallows Eve (31st October) and at Winchester? There seems to be no reason to change it. Dunstan then says that Eadred was crowned in May 946 (it was August 16th, that year). If such facts, that can easily be checked, are incorrect, how can we trust the rest of the story?

I suppose the ordinary reader will not care about these details. It covers most of the events of St Dunstan’s life. It gives plausible explanations for the “miracles” performed by him. It has the usual replacement of personal names by more “understandable” versions, although I was a bit distracted by “Beatrice” – apparently a version was around at the time, but, to me, it sounds anachronistic. Apart from the errors, it is well written. At 480 pages I finished it in two days.

Two days when I could have been writing. I managed just over 4k words this week before I switched to reading about Dunstan.

Am I being unfair, because it doesn’t fit with “my” version of the period? I hope not, but I was glad Byrhtnoth wasn’t mentioned in this book – favourably or otherwise. I’m sure that if I didn’t know the period, I would have liked the book. I remember reading and enjoying the author’s Emperor series about Julius Caesar and then reading several of the Conqueror series. I didn’t read them all, I’m not sure why, perhaps I wasn’t interested enough in Genghis Khan etc.

If you want an interesting read about a neglected historical figure, buy the book. If you know anything about Anglo-Saxon history avoid it.

Back to work, but is it too late?

With a sigh of relief, I am writing again. When I returned to Byrhtnoth 2 (first draft) I realised that I had abandoned it for four weeks.

There was no problem, it was planned. There was editing to do, a blurb to be written (still a work in progress!), chocolate eggs to be eaten, and a lot of thinking to do. Too much thinking – I am beginning to get ideas for book three, but I must resist the muse’s call and get book two finished first. At least I had left my protagonist in a comfortable position – too comfortable, but I have thrown a bucket of cold water over him and got him going again.

I warmed up on Thursday, with the first writing class of this term. Well, not actually at the class – when given an exercise, my mind went blank. But later, when I got home. I wrote about 600 words on the subject of foreshadowing. I cheated – I started book 3! I’m not sure what I was foreshadowing, because I don’t yet know what is going to happen, but it’s not looking good for a major character. I wonder who it will be?

The best type of foreshadowing is quite unintentional. Sometimes I write something, some minor detail, something to fill the gap between one scene and the next. Later, it might be a few pages further on, or half the book, something happens and you say “Oh, that’s why I wrote that bit earlier.” Is it my brain being particularly clever or is someone else in control? Perhaps I’ll write more on that another time.

Having got my hand in, I managed 1175 words on Friday and 1318 on Saturday. I am back on schedule. I have Sunday under my belt and so long as on-one drags me out to “Do something because it’s a bank holiday today” I will write more this afternoon.

It’s May Day – let’s go dancing!

The enforced break has made me think about why I write. I have heard all about these writers who started scribbling in the pram; they always keep a note-book handy to write down ideas and have a cupboard full of half completed manuscripts. That’s not me. I started four years ago and I could stop tomorrow – couldn’t I?

I found myself saying something strange, last week at the self-publishing conference (report here). “Sometimes I wish I hadn’t started writing.” Sacrilege at an event like that, but what did I mean? I have got into the habit of writing regularly. When I stopped I felt ill for a couple of days; sick, shivery, unable to settle, almost as if I was suffering withdrawal symptoms. It was probably a coincidence, a passing cold.

I remember, back in the days when I helped run a Family History class, one of the first things we taught our students was: Be very careful, researching your ancestors can be addictive. I know, I have experienced that addiction for many years, I never thought I could  escape it. But now? Yes, I still get that thrill, when I am on the trail of some long-lost ancestor, but sometimes, just occasionally, when trawling through some list of names or ancient document, I pause, this is boring, what is Byrhtnoth, or some other character doing?

Have I exchanged one addiction for another?

Am I beyond help? I recently woke in the middle of the night and scrabbled round for a piece of paper, to write down a few words. Soon I’ll be doing it in broad daylight!

Help me! My name is Christine and I am a writer-holic.

 

 

 

Self-Publishing Conference – Take 2

On Saturday I attended the Self-Publishing Conference. This was my second visit, you can read about my first here. What was my experience this year? I see that I didn’t manage to live-tweet last year – the same thing happened. I also neglected to take any photographs – at all!

The main difference was at the lunch break. Last year I remember sitting on the floor, chatting with other authors and swapping cards. I arrived with some freshly printed cards, but managed to get rid of only two. I don’t know if the arrangements had changed or if I got there earlier, but I found space on a table. Most of the people I spoke to seemed to be staff/helpers/speakers. Over the day I spoke to several people, but since I had come with a friend, perhaps I was not as open to random chatting.

So why was I there? Last year was a bit of an experiment and I learned something of the direction I was travelling. This year, I had a purpose. I have a book, just about finished. I am seriously thinking about publishing – but how? I have spent a lot of money on editing and cover design. Could I do the rest myself? Someone had recommended CreateSpace, then there is KDP. What was the difference, should I go down that route or was there a different way? I know there are many different ways to publish, and more appearing all the time. My objective was to find the right way.

The Keynote speaker was Angus Phillips, Director of the Oxford International Centre for Publishing Studies. His subject was “The future of the book: the changing publishing landscape”. We heard about how book sales have changed. The growth of e-books has slowed, but the balance between digital and print has probably stabilised. Dedicated e-readers are less popular, but consumers are using other devises to read books. The outlook seems gloomy for bricks and mortar book shops – more are closing all the time. Readers are using the internet where there is less time for your product to make an impact. You have to get out there, promote your “brand”, write blogs, have a presence on social media etc, Physically visit book shops, festivals. Everything is changing – apparently the future is Virtual Reality. I’m not sure anyone knows how that is going to work.

We then split up for different sessions. My first was “Endorsements, Blurbs and Spine Design – Beyond the Cover.” with Chelsea Taylor, production manager and Jonathan White, sales & Marketing Manager, both with Troubador. I was hoping to find out how to write a blurb – some thing I have been having trouble with. There was rather too much about covers in general – size of images etc. I didn’t really need this, although I was gratified to note that my cover fulfilled most of the criteria. One interesting point is to avoid a photograph on the cover for Historical Fiction. Apparently it just looks wrong, readers will be put off. Endorsements should only be used if by a well-known name, otherwise avoid. In Spine Design you must think about using a cohesive design and there is no need to put all the information there – just enough to get the casual browser to pull out the book to see more. As for the blurb, it is wrong to tell the story, you must leave them wanting more. The first sentence must grab the reader’s attention. I wonder how I’m going to manage that?

There was a short break for refreshments. This was the only point on which I could complain. There was a large selection of coffee, tea and even hot chocolate. The was nothing cold, soft drinks or even water – at least that I could find. It was a sunny day and I’m sure not everyone wanted a hot drink.

The next session was “Doing it Differently: Crowdfunding and Partnership Publishing.” We were given a very useful sheet with all the different options listed; from Traditional to Vanity Publisher, via Self-Publishing (doing it yourself), Packagers (paying for someone else to do it for you), Curated (more of a partnership between you and the publisher) and Crowd-funding (raising the money before you publish). The session was chaired by Cressida Downing (my editor) and we heard from Alice Jolly, who crowd-funded a book that she was unable to get published any other way and Jeremy Thompson of The Book Guild Ltd who explained the various options that they provide. I think I now know understand what is available, but which to choose?

This was followed by lunch, which I have already mentioned. The food was excellent and there was plenty available.

After lunch, the Plenary Session was given by Clive Herbert, Head of Publisher Services, Nielson Book. “The growing importance of bibliographic data.” This sounds like a boring subject, but is essential to know about. Everyone knows about ISBN numbers, I had thought about buying a set of ten – one for ebook , one for print book, plus some left for next book etc. There is so much more you need to know. With 500 new titles published each day, how does a reader find your book in the right place (book shop, online), at the right time (publication date)? How do they know your book actually exists? Figures were thrown about, graphs shown and strange acronyms described – BIC (Book Industry Communication) which enables you to classify your book. So much information you need to think about – and it has to be in place 16 weeks or 112 days before your publication date. No wonder books take so long to publish! How would I find my way through this maze?

My handwriting deteriorates!

I stumbled, stunned, out of this session into “Boost Your Ebook’s Earnings: Maximising Sales.” with Rachel Gregory, Troubador’s Ebook Programme Manager. It sounded useful. But this was more figures, more things to think about. Different versions, so many platforms, lists of websites that might help – or not. My handwriting, not good at the best of times, was deteriorating. I’m sure I have a lot of interesting information – if only I could read it! Something that I thought was straightforward was much more complicated than I expected.

This was followed by a tea break. I found the cake this year – I needed it.

My final session was more restful “Do Judge a Book by its cover.” Chelsea Taylor (who I had already met in the Beyond the cover session) and Andy Vosper, Deputy Chief Executive of TJ International Ltd., talked covers, beautiful covers. A cover is subjective, you must decide who you want to attract – what will they find attractive. What to readers of your genre like? You must stick to that, but also make your book stand out from the others. We learned a lot about cover enhancements: Foil, UV Lamination, Glossy, Matt, Supermatt; I loved the feel of supermatt – there was a lot of passing around of books, touching and stroking. I was still thinking basic self-publishing. None of this can be done with Print on Demand, so I just enjoyed the experience. The beautiful things you can do with dust jackets on hardbacks. And who knew there were so many versions of a paperback: embossing, debossing, flaps, flaps with perforations to provide a tear out bookmark. But every addition to the basic book increases the cost. If you have plenty of money you can produce something unique. There was a bit about practicalities – what colour and quality paper to use, what font to use, on cover and inside, bringing details of the cover inside the book.

I emerged, stuffed to bursting point with information and a realisation that there was so much I didn’t know, but at least I now know what I don’t know. I calmed down with a glass of wine and a chat with my editor, before finding my driver. It gives an indication of the range of different sessions on offer that we had not shared any of them (apart from Keynote and Plenary). There were sessions about using the Media and how to avoid getting sued, Selling to Bookshops and how to deal with copyright, Children’s books, schools and libraries, Non-fiction and audio books.

It was an exhausting day, but I leaned a lot.

Did I come to a decision on which direction to take? Perhaps.

Am I going to tell you what? Of course not.

I might discuss that in a different post.

Description – Embellishment or Info-Dump?

How much description do you add to your story?

Do you go into lyrical descriptions of the world surrounding your characters: that fantastic sunset, every detail of that market scene, the name of every bird that sings in the forest as your hero passes on his horse, or every blow in the battle and every drop of blood that falls?

Or is it  ‘Just the facts, ma’am’?

I have been catching up on some reading. I have read two books, both long, both include a lot of description, but with very different results. Both are set in the Anglo-Saxon period.

The first is “Under Lynden Church” by Lindsay Jacob. I am not sure where I first noticed it, but it was £2.64 on Kindle and looked interesting.

It is partly set in modern times. An archaeologist finds a grave, deep below a village church, not far from Cambridge. It is connected, in a way not immediately apparent, to events in the ninth century. It is the time of the Danish invasion, but King Alfred is barely mentioned. This is East Anglia. King Edmund (later St Edmund) is dead. The last of the Wuffingas fights against the Danes, as well as the neighbouring King of Mercia.

Most of the action is set in Ely and the fens, as is some of my book. It had all the signs of being interesting. None of the characters appear to be real people but that is what writers of historical fiction do (all fiction for that matter). They take a situation that might have happened and work it into a story. Nothing wrong with that. This story was good, I wanted to enjoy it, but…

It was hard going, I seemed to be reading it very slowly – it was on my Kindle and the percentage counter never seemed to move. That was when I realised it was 545 pages. I struggled on. There is a lot of description of people struggling through the fens – I felt I was with them every step of the way. I soon wondered if I should give up, but a book has to be exceptionally bad for me to give up. I would go halfway then decide whether to finish it. At that point I was interested enough to carry on and eventually finished it.

I was disappointed, because it could have been so much better. The author had found a good plot, she had obviously done a lot of research, but it was if she had then decided that was it and published everything, in the rough order of the plot, dropping in the “modern” part of the story at random. With a good editor it would have been half the length and a decent read.

For example, the archaeologist meets someone in a pub and there are several pages of the man’s family history, from birth, through school, various jobs, his relationship with his wife, her affair with another man and how they now enjoy sitting at home watching television. It’s not even revealed by conversation and is completely unnecessary.

On the other hand, characters are neglected, ignored for long periods of time, then reappear. Sometimes they have changed, with no explanation of why. Others remain the same throughout, never evolving from their first appearance to the end. I remember a scene of people returning from a battle. A woman is upset, her lover has died. It stopped me in my tracks – her lover? I scrolled back a couple of pages (yes, just a couple) She had arrived at the camp. They must have met because he was there, but there was no mention of a meeting, much less becoming lovers. Why waste page after interminable page of tramping through mud and then throw away such character development. If you want to keep reading, want to find out what happens to the characters, you need to know them.

The characters were too alike. The men were all weak, downtrodden, miserable – apart from the nasty bullies. The women were all heroic – the main character (Emma?) leads the army. Is she the woman in the coffin? Perhaps not, because there are other woman just as worthy. I lost track of all the coffins and burials at the end.Was it the end, I wasn’t sure, and by that time I just didn’t care.

After that, I had to read something else. as you need a glass of water after a large, slightly dry sandwich, all bread and little filling.

Recently I was in the local library. I went there to do some local history research, looking up someone in a directory. To get to the local studies area you have to pass lots of books (they still have a few despite the effort nowadays to fill libraries with computer screens!). I saw a couple of interesting books and checked them out.

This was how I used to read – go to the library – take out as many books as I could – read them – return them – take out more. I sometimes wonder how many books I’ve read over the years, whole series when I found one and liked it. Attracted by a title, not many had attractive covers when I was young, not in the adult section anyway.

The book I took this time was one I had seen mentioned, a review in the paper? A blog or website? Somewhere I had noticed it. This was another Anglo-Saxon book, but set much earlier, in the seventh century, in Northumbria. A popular time and place. The book was “Hild” by Nicola Griffith. It was also long, 640 pages in the Kindle version and costing £6.99. The library book was 625 words and of course, free.

Hild is the story of St Hilda of Whitby. Her early life, from the age of three to… I’m not sure of a her age at the end, late teens? Long before she became a nun and abbess.

Hild was the niece of King Edwin. Her mother brings her up as a seer, she becomes adviser to the king, but it is a precarious position. What will happen to her if she fails to tell him what will happen? There is nothing supernatural about this. An intelligent girl, she trains herself to watch everything and everyone. She roams the countryside, watching the animals, learning about plants, witnessing the weather. As part of the court she watches people, what they think, how they react, how to behave and how to influence them.

The royal court moves regularly. She learns about the different places and watches as they change. Over the years religion changes. Paulinus comes to the north with King Edwin’s new wife. He is determined to convert the pagans to Christianity – his brand of Christianity. He hates the Celtic monks and tries to destroy them. All the time Hild watches, judging, is this new religion good or bad? How will it affect the Kingdom?

Apart from politics, Hild works with the other royal women, in the weaving shed and dairy. With her mother and the queen she helps to set up trading links, both within the north but further afield.

She grows tall, she trains as a warrior, she carries a seax. People fear her because they do not understand her. Her fear is losing the people she loves. She fights to protect them – sometimes violently.

There is much description, but nowhere is it superfluous. The reader stands at Hild’s shoulder, learning with her. The places and countryside, the details of everyday life, what women do, and men. I learned so much of life at that time. I think I will have to buy a copy, just for reference.

But as well as useful, the descriptions are beautiful, like poetry. It was a long book, but I didn’t want it to end.

So, two books. One has taught me how not to write, the other an inspiration to aspire to.

Better get writing again.

Belated Memories of a Pirate – and other deaths.

Every year I remember the Eleventh of April. This year I forgot – well I remembered late in the day – too late to blog about it.

It is the anniversary of the death of John Madder, in 1705. He was a real person, but not a real pirate, that was the excuse they gave to kill him.

I remember him because of his name, which I used to share.
I remember him because of his tragic death, with its connections to the Union, or not, between England and Scotland.
And now I remember him as the person who started me writing. Read about that in a previous post. I could so easily have written my novel about him – perhaps, sometime, I will.

The reason I forgot to remember was because I was too busy remembering.

In another life, I am responsible for running a website remembering men who died in the First World War. We publish a biography of each man from our local war memorial on the centenary of his death (there are over four hundred). I don’t do it all myself, we have volunteers, although not as many as I’d like. But I am the coordinator. I read them through, checking for mistakes then publish them on the blog. Last weekend was the centenary of the Battle of Arras – the anniversary was in the news, mainly about the Canadians at Vimy Ridge. But from our town, in the centre of England, six men died on Sunday 9th April 1917, two more on Monday and another two yesterday. Those last two were in the same regiment, the Royal Warwickshire Regiment. I have been reading the war diaries – they are not named, just included in the anonymous list of casualties.

Total casualties for the period 9th to 21st Incl.
Killed: 2 Officers,  43 Other Ranks (includes 10 died of wounds since)
Wounded and missing: 1 Officer, 0 Other Ranks
Wounded:  5 Officers,  173 Other Ranks
Missing: 0 Officers, 33 Other Ranks
Missing believed wounded: 0 Officers, 1 Other Ranks.

Most casualties were from enemy shelling as they assembled before the attack.

So many men, so many stories. Perhaps I should be writing about that period, I have learned so much about it. Many writers, better than me, have done just that.

I started thinking about Byrhtnoth. What would he think about the four year battle that was the First World War? The idea would excite him – he loves to fight. But the reality would shock him. For him, war is man to man, fighting in the shield wall. Not sheltering in a trench from overhead bombardment. We tend to think that the Dark Ages (or Early Middle Ages, as they are now called.) was a violent time. If you read some authors it was all battles! But the battles were short, afterwards the survivors went home, harvested their crops, had feasts and told stories round the hearth.

Our job, as writers, particularly of Historical Fiction, is an act of remembrance. We remember the men and woman, famous or invisible. We bring them alive, tell their stories, so they will be remembered.

So I will not say that this week I have done no writing. I have been writing biographies, in my own act of remembrance.

If you do not know the man (or woman), how can you remember him?

The Book now Standing…

I’m not saying that the book is at a standstill – it is waiting, billowing steam everywhere, eager to go, but, at the moment, waiting.

This is not a problem, it is a planned stop. As mentioned last week I was expecting Book 1 back from my editor. It was delayed for a few days so I managed 4,860 words (of book 2) this week. This included a scene I had been dreading writing from the start. I managed to write it, although I’m not sure I’ll ever let anyone read it. At least I got the words out! I have now reached a total 82,711, the end is in sight, downhill all the way. I just hope I don’t hit the buffers. But enough of these train metaphors – I can’t use them in my books, so it’s good to get them off my chest!

A train, going nowhere – yet.

I am now editing, not writing. It’s going OK so far. Most of the red ink is to do with my mistakes over the punctuation of dialogue – I promise I’ll get it right from now on. Then there is my unfortunate compulsion for the passive tense, all nicely sorted. It has been a bit of a shock to hear my characters speaking with someone else’s voice when extra text is needed, but that is something I must accept – most of the time.

There was one comment. It concerns a character that is introduced early in the book, and never again. Could there be more about her later?  I spent a lot of time thinking about this and came up with something – she enters and disappears again. Should she appear again? It this point I received another editorial communication. Could she be connected to another character?

My first thought was No. Then I got one of those flashes of inspiration. Perhaps she isn’t a separate character, perhaps she is a character that is already there! It kept me up half the night. It couldn’t be her, because of the age difference. If I change that, then something later isn’t right. Alter this and that becomes impossible. I don’t know if I can sort it out. If I do, it will mean some re-writing, but the book will be better.

It is a good job that I was not planning to rush into print (or the digital equivalent.) For a few moments I was tempted. I discovered that Conn Iggulden (one of the big beasts in Historical Fiction) publishes a new book next month – 4th May – not that you’re interested. The title is Dunstan: One Man Will Change the Fate of England. It is about Dunstan (later St Dunstan). Dunstan is a character in my book (minor but important). It starts in the year 937 – so does mine.

After screaming, rolling on the floor and tearing out my hair, my first thought was “Should I give up now?” Everyone will assume that I was copying him. What if I published first? Apart from the fact that no-one would notice, I’m not sure if I could manage that in a month. Anyway, why rush? I’m not ready yet.

My second thought was: If his book is a success, then it shows that there is a market of this period. Just as there is room for Bernard Cornwall and… everyone else who writes about King Alfred, or other personalities of the Anglo-Saxon period. I can live with it.

Just please, please, no-one write a book about Byrhtnoth – at least not until I’m famous and they can be accused of copying me!