Interview My Character – Wulfhere, Thegn of Horstede

Today I have a visitor on my blog. As part of the Historical Writer’s Forum Blog Hop, I am interviewing a character from the Sons of the Wolf by Paula Lofting, a series of historical novels set in the 11th century in the years leading up to the Battle of Hastings. 

Wulfhere is a rather large Anglo Saxon warrior, so I have made sure Byrhtnoth is out of the way, in case he gets jealous and starts a fight.

Welcome Wulfhere, may I offer you some mead, or would you prefer ale?

Mead if I may, the strongest you have.

I make it myself and have had no complaints. Waes Hael!
Now, please introduce yourself – who you are, what you do?

Well, Christine, I am a king’s thegn, which means I am beholden to him for my 5 hides of land. The current king is Edward, son of the old king Æthelred, whom I believe became known as the Badly Counselled. As a king’s thegn, I am expected to carry out certain duties such as attending court on a rota system where I work under the chief staller, Esegar, who happens to be a relation of my wife, Ealdgytha’s. I must also owe military service to my king, therefore I am oathsworn to Harold Godwinson, the Earl of Wessex and whose jurisdiction I live within.

Forgive me for asking, but are you a real historical person or did your author create you?

I am based on a true figure in history which my scop found in the Domesday Book. He owned ‘my’ land so to speak, which is Horstede, now called ‘Little Horsted’ so I am told. I’m not sure, but I like to think that he would have been happy with my portrayal of him, even if I am somewhat flawed. I never wanted to be a hero, because I know this image is far too difficult for a man like me to live up to, but people often put the label on me. I would say that I have done heroic things, but I am not a hero by any stretch. I try to be loyal to my king and my Lord Harold whom I have known since I was boy. My father served his father, so there is a strong family tie there. Harold and used to share a lot of time together as we grew up, but lately, since he has become more powerful, not so much. There are times when I feel I no longer know him, and because of him, I have been forced to compromise my loyalty to him and my honour. It has been very difficult at times to feel the love I once had for him as much as I used to because of what I have lost.

Can you tell me in a few brief sentences: what is the novel you feature in about?

I shall try to be brief! The novels I feature in are from a series: Sons of the Wolf, 2 books of which are published, and one is a WIP.
They are currently set in the years leading up to the Battle of Hastings which is, I understand, the most pivotal battle in our English history. The series aims to be a 6 book series and will cover the rebellions post Hastings. The central theme is based around myself and my family. We are a normal middle-class family – we have our ups and downs, my 3 sons can be unruly at times and my 2 eldest daughters a little wild, running in the forest, barefoot like urchins. But I love my wife and my children, though I am not as good a father and husband as I should be. The ongoing theme of the story is a bloodfeud between myself and my neighbour, Helghi, who covets what I own and he will go to any lengths to get it.

It sounds like an interesting story, how did your author meet up with you?

She tells me she was looking for a central character to play alongside the historical characters of the period in which she is writing which starts in the mid-1050s. I have to say that I didn’t like her at first, because she made me do things that I didn’t want to, but I found that if I played along, I get to do things that I might normally not have, had I been the perfect hero.

Tell me about one or two of the other characters who feature with you – husband, wife, family? Who are some of the nice characters and who is the nastiest one?

I have a beautiful wife, Ealdgytha and she has given me seven children, three boys and four girls, one of who dies in infancy which was heart-breaking. It was terrible to see my wife suffer her grief after losing the child. Drusilda was such a lovely little thing and had not even seen two summers. I love my children very much, all of them, but they do cause a lot of heartache, especially when they die! My favourite child was my eldest daughter, Freyda, but she broke my heart when she fell in with the son of my arch enemy, Helghi, who owns the land nearby. The families of Helghi and I have had a long running feud for many years, but it had lain dormant for some time, and when Freyda begins secretly trysting with Helghi’s son, Edgar, in the forest, the affair rekindles the bloodfeud that brings all sorts of havoc to Sussex.

Helghi is one of the nastiest creatures I have ever known and sees his own failure to do well in the world as being my fault. He is envious of what and who I am, and what I have, though what I have is not that much in the grand scale of things. But he wants it, my land, my daughters, my horses, my home and my wealth, such that it is. And he will do anything to get them, even murder.

He sounds a real villain. On to something more pleasant. What is your favourite scene in the book?

Hmmm… [ rubs chin thoughtfully] So there are many favourites in both books, but I’ll pick one from each that contain me in them, of course. From Sons of the Wolf: I love the scenes where I am with Ealdgytha, my wife. There is so much burning passion, bitterness, and emotion. I get to let a lot of that out. Ealdgytha and I spend most of the books tearing chunks out of each other, but the one I favour the most is the one where I am going to betray her, and she knows and tries to stand in my way, but in the end, she realises that there is no point, because when I get an idea to do something in my head, there’s no way I can stop it. It’s like my soul is taken over and I cannot fight it. But in the end, it not only causes those I love much pain, it causes me pain too.

I think my favourite scene in The Wolf Banner has to be the one where I fight the Cheampa feoht, the fight of champions. I shall not give too much away, but here I get to show my strength and fighting skills and I get to play the hero. It’s an awesome feeling to be able to demonstrate how much I love the fight. As much as I hate war and battles, my inner warrior revels in it. Its something I was born to; fighting and killing is in my blood. It’s exhilarating.

Your author has provided us with an extract of your fight later in this post. So, what is your least favourite scene?

Probably one of the worst scenes I’ve had to experience so far is the one where I lose my son. It’s absolutely heart-breaking, and I don’t think I ever get over it. I still haven’t. I cannot explain the pain of losing a loved one in such a way that I lose him, watching them die in your arms and know that there is nothing you can do. The pain lingers long after they are gone, too, knowing I should have been there to protect him, and wasn’t.

What are you most proud of about your author?

I think the thing that makes me proud of her is the fact that she has worked so hard to produce a great story, hours of research  (she does re-enactment you know, so she can get a feel for the period and time in which I live) and editing the story. The Wolf Banner had to be edited several times before she was pleased with it. Its also had 4 editors work on it! She wants her readers to feel that they have received value for their money. Her books have won a few awards, including the prestigious IndieBRAG medallion.

Has your author written other books about you? If not, about other characters? How do you feel about your author going off with someone else!

Sons of the Wolf, is a planned series – well, planned in the sense she knows where she is going with the storyline, however she is more of a panster than a planner. So far I am featuring as one of the central characters in the books, and although the stories are based around me, there are other threads that have their own lead characters, namely Burghred, son of Alfgar, and my son Tovi, who has just got a job with Harold Godwinson as a trainee huscarle. I do get a bit jealous when she goes off with Lord Harold at times, after all, he is the Golden Balls of our time! But I understand that she wants to create an interesting tale that keeps the readers wanting to read on because with more than one lead character, they won’t get bored! She is currently writing the third book in the series which she hopes will be out later this year or early next year: Wolf’s Bane. There is always a wolf theme going on in the books which is reflected in the title.

Finally, as a character, if you could travel to a time and place different to your own fictional setting,  where and when would you go?

Gosh, that’s difficult because I only know what’s passed, I don’t know what our future is, though my author has told me that there will be a great civil war called War of the Roses which sounds very intriguing, and interesting! I’m not sure I would want to go through all those bloody battles though, I have been advised by my author who is also a nurse of mind health, that I have something called Post Traumatic Stress Disorder – or Combat Stress, which is why I have nightmares and have been drinking a lot of strong liquor these days. So I am thinking that I would like to go to a time and a place where there was little conflict for me to be involved in, if there would be such a thing, so I could live peaceably with my children and a good woman to share my bed. Do you know of such a place?

I’m not sure whether I do. My own time is probably more peaceful than most, but there is still fighting in some lands, and warriors will always be drawn to it. And authors will be attracted to the stories the warriors, or their families, have to tell.
Thank you for telling me something about you life, it has been interesting to meet you. You can collect your weapons at the door. And if you meet a tall young man outside, perhaps you can warn him about the pitfalls of a warrior’s life. Not that he will listen – you know what young men are like!

Excerpt from The Wolf Banner: The Cheampa Feoht

Wulfhere was considered tall amongst his companions, but this Harald was taller – and broader and armed with a dangerous looking Dane-axe.  He swung the weapon with effortless agility, as though it were a child’s plaything. The blade edge had a span of almost a foot long and Wulfhere shuddered, remembering the battle of Hereford, where he’d witnessed blades smaller than this cutting into horses’ necks with frightening ease.

The crowds on both sides shouted for their warrior. Amidst the cacophony of jeering and cheering, a soft wind blew an aroma of sun on damp grass and meadowsweet. It felt ironic; here he was, waiting for death, whilst nature infused the air with the sweetest odours of life. It is a pleasant day to die, Wulfhere thought ironically.

Leofwin’s priest had blessed him, and it was little comfort to know that his sins were absolved. But his sons would be watching, and he wanted them to know that if he lost today, it would be gloriously. He mouthed the words of the Paternoster, and readied himself, his spear high, shield gripped across his torso.

The big blade arced in the air. Harald stormed toward him. Wulfhere’s stomach muscles tensed, bile rising in his throat. The great broad-axe danced before him in a circular movement, revealing the vulnerable, exposed parts of Harald’s body.

Wulfhere slowed his breathing as Harald was nearly upon him. He gained control of his shaking spear hand, and fixed his glare on the snarling Norþmann. Shiny metal glinting in the sun descended, aimed at the exposed area of Wulfhere’s neck. He leapt back, clear of the blow. Harald was propelled forward by the impetus of the action, stumbling on ungainly legs. Wulfhere thrust the spear low into his enemy’s inner thigh with a satisfying sensation of splitting skin and tissue.

Harald gave a pathetic half-cry, as though merely stung by a wasp. Wulfhere tugged his spear free, blood painting the shaft a bright shade of crimson. He backed away out of Harald’s reach as the big man drew himself up and raised the axe, shaking his head, scowling. He screamed an obscenity in Norse, and Wulfhere shrugged an apology. “Oh, have I hurt you? I am sorry.”

Their supporters shouted encouragement. Harald repeated his display, swinging the axe around his head this time, showing his dexterity. Wulfhere continued to glare at him, unblinking. The eyes of his enemy reflected a thousand Dunsinanes and Herefords. Wulfhere’s fear settled, his mind a whirlpool of fury. He wasn’t going to die today, God help him – he wasn’t! He had not survived the horrors of those battles to die here at the hands of this ill-begotten lump of garbage. His children would not be orphaned. His wife would not go without a husband. Not today.

The axe whirred above and below Harald’s head as it gathered momentum. Wulfhere averted his eyes from the blade to avoid being blinded by its blur. He fixated on the deadly movement of his opponent’s arms, and counted: one, when the arms went up; two, they came down. He knew he would have to be quick. He tried to move around Harald – crab-like – to the right and to the left. It was futile, he would not get his spear into the man’s back. Whichever way he went, Harald moved with him. It was no use. Wulfhere had no choice but to let him come to him.

 At last, Harald swung his axe at Wulfhere’s head. Wulfhere flung up his shield. It took the brunt of the hit, jarring his arm, the blade through the other side. He was down, not hit, but his shield was wrecked. The crowd chanted, urging him to rise.

 Someone was calling out, “For Hereford! For Hereford!” and he was immediately transported to another time, riding amongst the carnage of that battle. Great blood-stained broad-axes, blades flashing, were cutting into the beautiful necks of the war horses. Blood rained down on his face, splattering into his mouth and eyes, screams torturing the air. The maiming of horses had made him angry then, and it was making him angry now! Men dying was one thing, but Christ on the cross – not the horses!

Sons of the Wolf Book 1
Sons of the Wolf Book 2: The Wolf Banner

Giveaway: The author has kindly offered an ebook copy of an ebook of Sons of the Wolf to two winners. To enter, simply leave a comment below this post or on the post about this interview on the Facebook page. The draw will be made on 4th July. Good luck!

Biography:
Paula Lofting began writing her Sons of the Wolf series whilst training to be a nurse in 2005 -8. Inspired by a re-enactment of the Battle of Hastings, Paula wanted to explore what really happened to bring the Normans over the sea to conquer the Anglo-Saxons and so she researched, joining a re-enactment society to enhance the research.
She lives in West Sussex, not far from where her books are set, and works as a psychiatric nurse during the day and writing in her spare time. Having always been an avid reader of history and historical fiction, she has three grown up children and a granddaughter.


Links:
Website –    1066:The Road to Hastings and Other Stories
Email –        contact@paulalofting.com
Facebook –  Paula Lofting Facebook Page
Blogger –    paulaperuses.blogspot.com
Twitter –      http://twitter.com/paulalofting

If you enjoyed this post, why not visit some of the other posts on the Historical Writers Forum Blog Hop? The next one is Paula herself interviewing Prince of Agrius, Casmir, from Stephanie Churchill’s Crowns of Destiny trilogy

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10 thoughts on “Interview My Character – Wulfhere, Thegn of Horstede

  1. Thanks for hosting Wulfhere, Christine, I’m afraid he’s too busy to thank you himself as he’d just found young Byrhtnoth and is giving him an earful over plenty of mugs of mead! Don’t expect him home till very late.

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  2. Pingback: Character Blog Hop is here! – The Road to Hastings and other Stories

  3. The Giveaway has now ended and the winners informed. But please don’t let that stop you from commenting and don’t forget to check out the rest of the posts on this Blog Hop for more goodies.

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