Interview My Character – Wulfhere, Thegn of Horstede

Today I have a visitor on my blog. As part of the Historical Writer’s Forum Blog Hop, I am interviewing a character from the Sons of the Wolf by Paula Lofting, a series of historical novels set in the 11th century in the years leading up to the Battle of Hastings. 

Wulfhere is a rather large Anglo Saxon warrior, so I have made sure Byrhtnoth is out of the way, in case he gets jealous and starts a fight.

Welcome Wulfhere, may I offer you some mead, or would you prefer ale?

Mead if I may, the strongest you have.

I make it myself and have had no complaints. Waes Hael!
Now, please introduce yourself – who you are, what you do?

Well, Christine, I am a king’s thegn, which means I am beholden to him for my 5 hides of land. The current king is Edward, son of the old king Æthelred, whom I believe became known as the Badly Counselled. As a king’s thegn, I am expected to carry out certain duties such as attending court on a rota system where I work under the chief staller, Esegar, who happens to be a relation of my wife, Ealdgytha’s. I must also owe military service to my king, therefore I am oathsworn to Harold Godwinson, the Earl of Wessex and whose jurisdiction I live within.

Forgive me for asking, but are you a real historical person or did your author create you?

I am based on a true figure in history which my scop found in the Domesday Book. He owned ‘my’ land so to speak, which is Horstede, now called ‘Little Horsted’ so I am told. I’m not sure, but I like to think that he would have been happy with my portrayal of him, even if I am somewhat flawed. I never wanted to be a hero, because I know this image is far too difficult for a man like me to live up to, but people often put the label on me. I would say that I have done heroic things, but I am not a hero by any stretch. I try to be loyal to my king and my Lord Harold whom I have known since I was boy. My father served his father, so there is a strong family tie there. Harold and used to share a lot of time together as we grew up, but lately, since he has become more powerful, not so much. There are times when I feel I no longer know him, and because of him, I have been forced to compromise my loyalty to him and my honour. It has been very difficult at times to feel the love I once had for him as much as I used to because of what I have lost.

Can you tell me in a few brief sentences: what is the novel you feature in about?

I shall try to be brief! The novels I feature in are from a series: Sons of the Wolf, 2 books of which are published, and one is a WIP.
They are currently set in the years leading up to the Battle of Hastings which is, I understand, the most pivotal battle in our English history. The series aims to be a 6 book series and will cover the rebellions post Hastings. The central theme is based around myself and my family. We are a normal middle-class family – we have our ups and downs, my 3 sons can be unruly at times and my 2 eldest daughters a little wild, running in the forest, barefoot like urchins. But I love my wife and my children, though I am not as good a father and husband as I should be. The ongoing theme of the story is a bloodfeud between myself and my neighbour, Helghi, who covets what I own and he will go to any lengths to get it.

It sounds like an interesting story, how did your author meet up with you?

She tells me she was looking for a central character to play alongside the historical characters of the period in which she is writing which starts in the mid-1050s. I have to say that I didn’t like her at first, because she made me do things that I didn’t want to, but I found that if I played along, I get to do things that I might normally not have, had I been the perfect hero.

Tell me about one or two of the other characters who feature with you – husband, wife, family? Who are some of the nice characters and who is the nastiest one?

I have a beautiful wife, Ealdgytha and she has given me seven children, three boys and four girls, one of who dies in infancy which was heart-breaking. It was terrible to see my wife suffer her grief after losing the child. Drusilda was such a lovely little thing and had not even seen two summers. I love my children very much, all of them, but they do cause a lot of heartache, especially when they die! My favourite child was my eldest daughter, Freyda, but she broke my heart when she fell in with the son of my arch enemy, Helghi, who owns the land nearby. The families of Helghi and I have had a long running feud for many years, but it had lain dormant for some time, and when Freyda begins secretly trysting with Helghi’s son, Edgar, in the forest, the affair rekindles the bloodfeud that brings all sorts of havoc to Sussex.

Helghi is one of the nastiest creatures I have ever known and sees his own failure to do well in the world as being my fault. He is envious of what and who I am, and what I have, though what I have is not that much in the grand scale of things. But he wants it, my land, my daughters, my horses, my home and my wealth, such that it is. And he will do anything to get them, even murder.

He sounds a real villain. On to something more pleasant. What is your favourite scene in the book?

Hmmm… [ rubs chin thoughtfully] So there are many favourites in both books, but I’ll pick one from each that contain me in them, of course. From Sons of the Wolf: I love the scenes where I am with Ealdgytha, my wife. There is so much burning passion, bitterness, and emotion. I get to let a lot of that out. Ealdgytha and I spend most of the books tearing chunks out of each other, but the one I favour the most is the one where I am going to betray her, and she knows and tries to stand in my way, but in the end, she realises that there is no point, because when I get an idea to do something in my head, there’s no way I can stop it. It’s like my soul is taken over and I cannot fight it. But in the end, it not only causes those I love much pain, it causes me pain too.

I think my favourite scene in The Wolf Banner has to be the one where I fight the Cheampa feoht, the fight of champions. I shall not give too much away, but here I get to show my strength and fighting skills and I get to play the hero. It’s an awesome feeling to be able to demonstrate how much I love the fight. As much as I hate war and battles, my inner warrior revels in it. Its something I was born to; fighting and killing is in my blood. It’s exhilarating.

Your author has provided us with an extract of your fight later in this post. So, what is your least favourite scene?

Probably one of the worst scenes I’ve had to experience so far is the one where I lose my son. It’s absolutely heart-breaking, and I don’t think I ever get over it. I still haven’t. I cannot explain the pain of losing a loved one in such a way that I lose him, watching them die in your arms and know that there is nothing you can do. The pain lingers long after they are gone, too, knowing I should have been there to protect him, and wasn’t.

What are you most proud of about your author?

I think the thing that makes me proud of her is the fact that she has worked so hard to produce a great story, hours of research  (she does re-enactment you know, so she can get a feel for the period and time in which I live) and editing the story. The Wolf Banner had to be edited several times before she was pleased with it. Its also had 4 editors work on it! She wants her readers to feel that they have received value for their money. Her books have won a few awards, including the prestigious IndieBRAG medallion.

Has your author written other books about you? If not, about other characters? How do you feel about your author going off with someone else!

Sons of the Wolf, is a planned series – well, planned in the sense she knows where she is going with the storyline, however she is more of a panster than a planner. So far I am featuring as one of the central characters in the books, and although the stories are based around me, there are other threads that have their own lead characters, namely Burghred, son of Alfgar, and my son Tovi, who has just got a job with Harold Godwinson as a trainee huscarle. I do get a bit jealous when she goes off with Lord Harold at times, after all, he is the Golden Balls of our time! But I understand that she wants to create an interesting tale that keeps the readers wanting to read on because with more than one lead character, they won’t get bored! She is currently writing the third book in the series which she hopes will be out later this year or early next year: Wolf’s Bane. There is always a wolf theme going on in the books which is reflected in the title.

Finally, as a character, if you could travel to a time and place different to your own fictional setting,  where and when would you go?

Gosh, that’s difficult because I only know what’s passed, I don’t know what our future is, though my author has told me that there will be a great civil war called War of the Roses which sounds very intriguing, and interesting! I’m not sure I would want to go through all those bloody battles though, I have been advised by my author who is also a nurse of mind health, that I have something called Post Traumatic Stress Disorder – or Combat Stress, which is why I have nightmares and have been drinking a lot of strong liquor these days. So I am thinking that I would like to go to a time and a place where there was little conflict for me to be involved in, if there would be such a thing, so I could live peaceably with my children and a good woman to share my bed. Do you know of such a place?

I’m not sure whether I do. My own time is probably more peaceful than most, but there is still fighting in some lands, and warriors will always be drawn to it. And authors will be attracted to the stories the warriors, or their families, have to tell.
Thank you for telling me something about you life, it has been interesting to meet you. You can collect your weapons at the door. And if you meet a tall young man outside, perhaps you can warn him about the pitfalls of a warrior’s life. Not that he will listen – you know what young men are like!

Excerpt from The Wolf Banner: The Cheampa Feoht

Wulfhere was considered tall amongst his companions, but this Harald was taller – and broader and armed with a dangerous looking Dane-axe.  He swung the weapon with effortless agility, as though it were a child’s plaything. The blade edge had a span of almost a foot long and Wulfhere shuddered, remembering the battle of Hereford, where he’d witnessed blades smaller than this cutting into horses’ necks with frightening ease.

The crowds on both sides shouted for their warrior. Amidst the cacophony of jeering and cheering, a soft wind blew an aroma of sun on damp grass and meadowsweet. It felt ironic; here he was, waiting for death, whilst nature infused the air with the sweetest odours of life. It is a pleasant day to die, Wulfhere thought ironically.

Leofwin’s priest had blessed him, and it was little comfort to know that his sins were absolved. But his sons would be watching, and he wanted them to know that if he lost today, it would be gloriously. He mouthed the words of the Paternoster, and readied himself, his spear high, shield gripped across his torso.

The big blade arced in the air. Harald stormed toward him. Wulfhere’s stomach muscles tensed, bile rising in his throat. The great broad-axe danced before him in a circular movement, revealing the vulnerable, exposed parts of Harald’s body.

Wulfhere slowed his breathing as Harald was nearly upon him. He gained control of his shaking spear hand, and fixed his glare on the snarling Norþmann. Shiny metal glinting in the sun descended, aimed at the exposed area of Wulfhere’s neck. He leapt back, clear of the blow. Harald was propelled forward by the impetus of the action, stumbling on ungainly legs. Wulfhere thrust the spear low into his enemy’s inner thigh with a satisfying sensation of splitting skin and tissue.

Harald gave a pathetic half-cry, as though merely stung by a wasp. Wulfhere tugged his spear free, blood painting the shaft a bright shade of crimson. He backed away out of Harald’s reach as the big man drew himself up and raised the axe, shaking his head, scowling. He screamed an obscenity in Norse, and Wulfhere shrugged an apology. “Oh, have I hurt you? I am sorry.”

Their supporters shouted encouragement. Harald repeated his display, swinging the axe around his head this time, showing his dexterity. Wulfhere continued to glare at him, unblinking. The eyes of his enemy reflected a thousand Dunsinanes and Herefords. Wulfhere’s fear settled, his mind a whirlpool of fury. He wasn’t going to die today, God help him – he wasn’t! He had not survived the horrors of those battles to die here at the hands of this ill-begotten lump of garbage. His children would not be orphaned. His wife would not go without a husband. Not today.

The axe whirred above and below Harald’s head as it gathered momentum. Wulfhere averted his eyes from the blade to avoid being blinded by its blur. He fixated on the deadly movement of his opponent’s arms, and counted: one, when the arms went up; two, they came down. He knew he would have to be quick. He tried to move around Harald – crab-like – to the right and to the left. It was futile, he would not get his spear into the man’s back. Whichever way he went, Harald moved with him. It was no use. Wulfhere had no choice but to let him come to him.

 At last, Harald swung his axe at Wulfhere’s head. Wulfhere flung up his shield. It took the brunt of the hit, jarring his arm, the blade through the other side. He was down, not hit, but his shield was wrecked. The crowd chanted, urging him to rise.

 Someone was calling out, “For Hereford! For Hereford!” and he was immediately transported to another time, riding amongst the carnage of that battle. Great blood-stained broad-axes, blades flashing, were cutting into the beautiful necks of the war horses. Blood rained down on his face, splattering into his mouth and eyes, screams torturing the air. The maiming of horses had made him angry then, and it was making him angry now! Men dying was one thing, but Christ on the cross – not the horses!

Sons of the Wolf Book 1
Sons of the Wolf Book 2: The Wolf Banner

Giveaway: The author has kindly offered an ebook copy of an ebook of Sons of the Wolf to two winners. To enter, simply leave a comment below this post or on the post about this interview on the Facebook page. The draw will be made on 4th July. Good luck!

Biography:
Paula Lofting began writing her Sons of the Wolf series whilst training to be a nurse in 2005 -8. Inspired by a re-enactment of the Battle of Hastings, Paula wanted to explore what really happened to bring the Normans over the sea to conquer the Anglo-Saxons and so she researched, joining a re-enactment society to enhance the research.
She lives in West Sussex, not far from where her books are set, and works as a psychiatric nurse during the day and writing in her spare time. Having always been an avid reader of history and historical fiction, she has three grown up children and a granddaughter.


Links:
Website –    1066:The Road to Hastings and Other Stories
Email –        contact@paulalofting.com
Facebook –  Paula Lofting Facebook Page
Blogger –    paulaperuses.blogspot.com
Twitter –      http://twitter.com/paulalofting

If you enjoyed this post, why not visit some of the other posts on the Historical Writers Forum Blog Hop? The next one is Paula herself interviewing Prince of Agrius, Casmir, from Stephanie Churchill’s Crowns of Destiny trilogy

Guest Post – The Coming of the Saxons

Today I present another Guest Post. What a good way to avoid having to think up something new to write!

Today I welcome Mary Anne Yarde, a fellow Historical Fiction writer, although of a slightly earlier period, the sixth century. Her International Bestselling series – The Du Lac Chronicles, lie in that period generally known as Arthurian, although the books are set a generation later, after the fall of King Arthur. The story of the fight against the Saxon Invaders

I was surprised Mary Anne wanted to be associated with such an Anglo-Saxon centric blog, as I have read the first book in the series and I got the impression that the Saxons were the antagonists. She assures me that some very cool Saxon characters appear in the later books – more books for my TBR list.

Although we both write about the Anglo-Saxon world, my Byrhtnoth lives in the tenth century, four hundred years later and a very different world. I have asked Mary Anne to tell us about the early period, and the arrival of the Anglo-Saxons on our shores.

Welcome Mary Anne.

Mary Anne Yarde

The Coming of the Saxons…

In the year AD 425 Vortigern became the High King of Southern Britain — or so said the 6th Century British monk, Gildas. Vortigern’s reign of 30 years was not, however, without conflict. There was the constant threat of invasion from the Irish on the western seaboard. The Picts were invading from the north, and in the eastern seaboard, the Saxons were trying to push into Vortigern’s realm. It was a war on all fronts. It was a war he could not possibly win.

Vortigern turned to his Roman friends for help. But instead of military assistance, Flavius Aetius, a Roman general, sent Bishop Germanus of Auxerre and Bishop Severus of Trier, to Vortigern’s kingdom to find out what was going on and report back to him. However, Germanus was more concerned about finding the Pelagian heretics than the threat that Vortigern spoke of. Germanus and Severus took their leave, having done very little. Vortigern realised he would not receive any military aid from Rome. If he wanted to save his kingdom, then he was going to have to think of something else.

Vortigern did not have many choices open to him. If the Roman Empire would not come to his aid, then he would have to find someone who would. He looked to the land of the Jutes. Vortigern was not the first, and he was certainly not the last to employ mercenaries to fight for his cause.  He heard talk of two warrior brothers, Hengist and Horsa. These brothers had a fine army. It was these men that Vortigern struck a deal with. It is worth noting that although Hengist and Horsa were Jutes, they shared the same Germanic language (taking into account the different regional dialects), the same religious philosophies, and the same culture as the Saxons who were causing such a problem for Vortigern in the east.

In return for their services, Vortigern gave the brothers land in the Isle of Thanet, Kent. The mercenaries brought over their families, and for a while, things seemed to work well for all. The brothers and their men kept in check their Germanic kinfolk along the east coast. They were also a good match for the Picts in the north. They also help to curb the Irish ambitions as well. 

Hengist and Horsa arriving in Britain, by Richard Rowlands (1605)

Thanks to Hengist and Horsa, the threat to Vortigern’s kingdom, although still present, was, for now, kept in check. It was then that Hengist and Horsa decided that they were not being paid enough. They were risking their lives for Vortigern. They deserved more. Much more. So they took their demands to Vortigern, along with a promise… If Vortigern did not meet their demands, then they would take his kingdom as payment. It was only fair.

Vortigern found himself in a very difficult position. He had invited these mercenaries into his kingdom. In fact, he had kept on inviting them. And now, there were an awful lot of them. Too many. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicles states that:

“…the Saxons multiplied their numbers, and the British could not feed them.”

Vortigern raised taxes, in a bid to pay his mercenary army. But he could not raise sufficient funds. His people simply did not have the money, and they resented having to pay tax when these foreign settlers, Vortigern had invited over, did not have to pay at all. By the year AD 430 Vortigern faced the threat of civil war.  This unrest was led by a man, who the Welsh called, Emrys, and who others called Ambrosius Aurelianus. Vortigern did not know what to do. So he did what he always did. He recruited even more mercenaries. This decision would cost him his throne.

“Once lit, it did not die down. When it had wasted town and country in that area, it burnt up almost the whole surface of the island, until its red and savage tongue licked the western seas..”
On the Ruin and Conquest of Britain — Gildas

The Celts, although their loyalty to their High King had been stretched to the limit, rose up against these foreign aggressors. Vortigern was mortally wounded while leading a campaign to drive the Jutes back to the Isle of Thanet. With Vortigern’s death, the native Celts look to Ambrosius. In the year AD 473, Hengist and his son, Aesc, fought the Celts in Kent and were victorious. In AD 488, Aesc became King of Kent. As for Ambrosius… Nothing more is said of him.

Kent became a secure beachhead for Germanic invasions and eventually the conquest of Britain.

 

Bibliography:

(Author Unknown) — The Anglo-Saxon Chronicles (J. M. Dent, New edition, 1972)
Bede — Ecclesiastical History of the English People (Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, 2012)
Berresford Elllis, Peter — Celt and Saxon (The struggle for Britain AD 410-937) (Constable and Company Ltd , 1994)
Geoffrey of Monmouth — The History of the Kings of Britain (Penguin Books Ltd, 1966)
Gildas — On the Ruin and Conquest of Britain (Serenity Publishers, LLC, 2009)
Nennius — The History of the Britons (Dodo Press, July 2007)
Pryor, Francis — Britain AD: A Quest for Arthur, England and the Anglo-Saxons (HarperCollins Publisher, 2005)
Wood, Michael — In Search of the Dark Ages (BBC Books, 2005)
Wood, Michael — In Search of England (Penguin Books, 1999)

 

… and four hundred years later Byrhtnoth was killed, attempting to prevent the conquest of Britain (by then known as Englalond) by the Danes – some things never change!

Thank you, Mary Anne, for an interesting article.

If you want to find out more about the lives of the Du Lac family in these turbulent times, Book 4 of The Du Lac Chronicles, The Du Lac Prophecy is published today 28th August 2018.

Two Prophesies. Two Noble Households. One Throne.

Distrust and greed threaten to destroy the House of du Lac. Mordred Pendragon strengthens his hold on Brittany and the surrounding kingdoms while Alan, Mordred’s cousin, embarks on a desperate quest to find Arthur’s lost knights. Without the knights and the relics they hold in trust, they cannot defeat Arthur’s only son – but finding the knights is only half of the battle. Convincing them to fight on the side of the Du Lac’s, their sworn enemy, will not be easy.

If Alden, King of Cerniw, cannot bring unity there will be no need for Arthur’s knights. With Budic threatening to invade Alden’s Kingdom, Merton putting love before duty, and Garren disappearing to goodness knows where, what hope does Alden have? If Alden cannot get his House in order, Mordred will destroy them all.

You can find the book at:
Amazon US
https://www.amazon.com/Du-Lac-Prophecy-Book-Chronicles-ebook/dp/B07GDS3HPJ

Amazon UK
https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B07GDS3HPJ/

Amazon CA
https://www.amazon.ca/Du-Lac-Prophecy-Book-Chronicles-ebook/dp/B07GDS3HPJ/

And why not visit Mary Anne’s informative Website/Blog: : https://maryanneyarde.blogspot.com/

Finally, by the time you read this, the Historical Novel Society Conference in Scotland will be over. I hope to post a report of what happened there in the near future.

Guest Post – The Rise and Rise of Crime and Thriller Fiction

Today I host my first guest post.

I first met Sally Jenkins when we discovered both our books were to be published by The Book Guild, on the same day, January 28th 2018. We are not in competition, because our books are so different, she writes psychological thrillers and I write historical fiction.

Do these very different genres attract the same readers or do they remain completely separate? Today we introduce our blog readers to something different.

Welcome Sally:

Author Sally Jenkins

In 2017 18.7 million crime and thriller books were sold. This was an increase of 19 per cent over the previous two years. Even without the hard proof of these figures the popularity of dark fiction is obvious. Think about all those books with ‘Girl’ in the title, the influx of ‘noir’ TV box sets from Scandinavia and the emergence of a brand new fiction sub-genre, ‘grip lit’.  Grip lit is a blend of women’s fiction and psychological thriller, usually written by women and about women. And women readers account for just over half of all crime and thriller sales – so we do like to be scared!

Our fascination with dark fiction can be likened to the attraction of a roller coaster. In the former, we clutch the pages, not daring to turn out the bedside light in case something goes bump in the night. On the latter we scream and shriek with every rise and fall of the track. In both cases, as soon as the experience is finished we want to do it all over again! Val McDermid is the queen of crime thriller writers and she says, “A crime-thriller gives you an adrenalin rush. It’s exciting, suspense-laden … But you know it’s fiction and that the protagonist is going to make it out okay in the end. We live in a society increasingly fragmented and alienated. People … find reassurance in crime-thrillers because they know that in the end the world will be put right.”

Do the authors of all these crime and thriller novels need evil, twisted personalities in order to generate the material for their novels? Being a writer of psychological thrillers myself, I plead that we are nice people! As with all authors we pluck our ideas from what we see in the world around us and then embellish, sharpen and polish them from our own unique perspective on the world. One of the continuing themes or perspectives in my own novels is how past happenings rarely stay in the past. They can explode into our present day lives without warning and turn everything upside down. In Bedsit Three the evil comes from Ignatius, who was brought up by a domineering mother. The effect of this on his behaviour is seen as the novel progresses. The other characters in the book are also influenced by their early years but they work for a more positive outcome, begging the question: nature or nurture?

When I started to write my second novel, The Promise, my mind again darted backwards and forwards in time. The plot which emerged centres around a promise made in prison thirty years ago. This promise must now be kept by the next generation and leads to a blackmail attempt …

I’m certain the popularity of crime and thriller fiction will continue to grow. Modern day life is full of uncertainty, upheaval and unsolved crime. Books where good eventually conquers evil (after giving the reader a scary ride!) get my vote every time.

Visit Sally’s website, follow her on Twitter or view her books on Amazon.