How I won NaNoWriMo

Any writers reading this will know why there have been no posts for the last month. For those who haven’t experienced the terrors (and joys) of NaNoWriMo, let me explain.

NaNoWriMo stands for National Novel Writing Month, when writers with too much time on their hands write a novel – in a month – in November. Not quite a novel, but the first draft of one, 50,000 words to be precise. There are rules, although no one checks if you stick to them. The novel must be new, not something you are already working on. You are allowed to plan it beforehand, but must not start writing until the first of November. You finish on the 30th, or before if you reach that important 50k. You can enter the number of words you write each day and compare you total with other writers taking part (your buddies). When you reach the target, you must upload your work to validate the number of words and “win”.

What do you get if you win? There’s a certificate to download and … that’s about it.

No one checks what you have written. It could be complete rubbish. It probably is! So why do it? Why put your life on hold for a month to do something so strange? Well, for one reason, you are a writer and anything that forces you to write is good.

I had heard other writers talk about NaNoWriMo and last year considered taking part – and dismissed it. I was in the final stages of publishing Bright Sword, correcting proofs etc. This year I thought “Why Not?”. Bright Axe is close to the end. I was sick of Byrhtnoth and his problems. I needed a rest. A change is as good as a rest, they say and I had an idea that had been simmering for a while. I thought I could manage the 1,667 words a day that would be needed. So I signed up.

I made my plans. If I was to do this I needed to get rid of as many distractions as possible. I was involved with a First World War project, researching local men who had died. With the centenary of the armistice on 11th November, I had a deadline. I mentally altered the deadline to 31st October. Anything else outstanding I got out of the way, or delayed it to December. This explains why there were no posts in October either. There were certain events I could not avoid – a whole day at the NEC promoting Family History Societies. I thought I could cope by writing more the day before and after. I did.

As it turned out, there were only two days when I didn’t write at all. That day and another when I binged wrote the day before (nearly 3,000 words) and then had other things to do. I tried but I was just too tired. Apart from that I forced myself to the computer and wrote. Sometimes not enough, sometimes over the daily target of 1,667 words. It evened out, as you can see from the graph that measured my progress.

So what did I learn from the experience?
The main reason for doing it was to see if I could do it – I found I could.
I learned that I could control my writing. There were certain days when I had more time, so I wrote more on those days and didn’t worry when I couldn’t write, for whatever reason.
I discovered there was a limit to how much I could write a day – somewhere between 2,500 and 3,000 words. There was no point in writing more, it would be rubbish and I would be unable to write the next day.

I found it liberating. Doing something like this means there is no time to go back to correct things. Realise you have missed an important chapter? Never mind, write it now, you can put it in the right place later. Have I already written this event? Never mind, keep going, delete it later. Need some research? Don’t stop, add a note “Find date later”

It was also fun to write something different. I have written two books about Byrhtnoth and a draft of the third. Was I getting tired? Could I even write something, anything, else?
I won’t go into details, but this book is less serious. Still historical, but with time travel. Some of it is set in the present day – literally – it started on Halloween 2018. I could have a character say Okay. I could describe someone by saying they looked like some well known actor.
I enjoyed myself.

When I wasn’t writing, I was reading, one of the Outlander novels by Diana Gabaldon. Not to improve my writing, but because it was time travel. My work is set, partly, in Scotland, so it was useful to pick up some of the accent. The time period is not a hundred years away as well. She includes a lot of details of daily life – too much some might say – but useful for someone who has been inhabiting the tenth century for so long.

I am pleased to say my manuscript includes no stone circles or bare-chested highlanders. There is a pirate (of sorts) and a dog and that is all I am prepared to say. 

I don’t know what it is like, I haven’t read it yet. This is recommended by the organisers of NaNoWriMo. When you finish, you must put it away for a month – at least – before looking at it.
I know it is nowhere near being a proper book, although I know it has a beginning and an end and some interesting ideas in between, not necessarily in the correct order!

It doesn’t matter. I have something I can work on later. Perhaps it will never be published.
What it has done is teach me a lot about writing – or at least about how I write.
It has given me a big sense of achievement. I tried and I succeeded. Some of my “writing buddies” didn’t, all for very genuine reasons. Some did. I think the competitive element is important, although your main competitor is yourself.

Finally, it stops you thinking about Christmas until the start of December – still too early, but better than the alternative.

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