More about covers

Another book launch! Nothing for years, then two come along at (nearly) the same time.

For those few who have read Bright Sword and said they want to read the next in the series, I’m afraid this book isn’t it. But please, if you liked it, could I ask you to post a review? Here.

By coincidence, this book also has an orange cover and has a long thin pointy object on the front. It is the latest in a series of booklets on the history of Rugby, published by the Rugby Local History Research Group. In fact this is the tenth in the series – the first was published in 1975. They are all regularly reprinted and all are available locally. They are not on-line (Actually a couple are listed, but not available.)

The books are about 70 pages and contain articles written by members of the Group. It is a very small group, which is why it tales so long to produce the books. We have done books on Rugby in the Victorian period, during ww1 and ww2 and the 2oth century. But mostly they contain a variety of subjects – whatever the member finds interesting. Memories of childhood, a local industry or some incident that has caught the eye in the local newspaper.

The articles are passed around for comment/editing and collected together,  they are proof read, a few pictures are added to fill any awkward gaps and sent to a local printer, together with the cover design.

How do we design the cover?

Each book is a different colour, depending on what card the printer has available. This time the only colours we haven’t already used were orange and a bright pink. Everyone preferred orange, the next will have to be pink! Sometimes we have a big argument on what picture to use – everyone wants a picture from their own article. Only a few are suitable as it has to make a distinctive silhouette. Why not have a “proper” picture? Because it’s always been done this way! For this book, there was an article about the R.C. Church of St Maries, in Rugby. Someone had a decent photograph, no problems with copyright and no one objected. It was turned into a silhouette, and the title was added. Job done.

It was all free – unless you count the time taken by the poor person who has to do all this – me!

Compare it with the cover for Bright Sword. I employed a proper designer. I made a few suggestions, she produced samples. We discussed them and I made a final decision. Minor changes were later made by the publisher, but that was it. No other “authors” to fight it out with. Price – a lot more, but you get what you pay for.

In the end, the Aspects of Rugby book was all done in a rush, because I was giving a talk in the library and we wanted to use it to launch the book. The talk was “Rugby: Development of a Town”. It was part of the BBC Civilisations Festival – we might have got a few more people if the Library had thought to put that on the posters, or put said posters somewhere people could see them! No Anglo-Saxon Warriors this time. Just me and a projector, although Anglo-Saxons were mentioned (was it founded by them or was it earlier?). I didn’t have the courage to mention “my” book. But we did sell a few copies of “our” book. In fact I think we sold more copies on the day, than I did, probably because it was cheaper.

If you are interested in the book, there are details on the website. Or there would be, but it doesn’t seem to be working at the moment. And guess who has to fix that?

Not surprising I find it difficult to find time to write. Around 6,500 words written. sounds good, but that’s over two weeks. I managed over 2,000 on one day, so I can do it when I try – and don’t have anything else to do!

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Prize Winning Author

Have you noticed? You look at the website or blog of a well known author, and some not so well known authors, and are faced with a sidebar full of awards. Their biography includes every single literary prize they have one from the year dot and the cover of their latest book proclaims it to be “prize winning” – occasionally it actually states which prize! Has anyone ever bought a book because the author has won a prize?

Do I sound jealous? I shouldn’t. I too have won a writing prize.

Last Monday evening, it was the Rugby Family History Group AGM and Christmas Social. As a member of the committee I was armed with my report – how far we had got with the transcription of a local Parish Register; how our First World War Project was going (300 men researched, 100+ to go) more volunteers wanted, and what was happening on the website (not a lot). We dozed through the financial report and looked elsewhere when asked if there were any volunteers to replace the secretary, who was retiring at that meeting. Another report concerned the Magazine. As always the editor complained of lack of copy, please could someone write something for the next issue. Because I’m a helpful type, I can usually manage to produce something when she gets desperate

Some years ago, to encourage submissions, we set up The Harry Batchelor Prize for the best article in the previous years magazines (three issues). This is to commemorate our first Chairman, and is presented at the end of the AGM – before we let the hordes loose on the food – provided, of course, by the committee. The prize is judged by someone from the local library, a local writer and last years winner. I got out my camera to take photographs, to add to the website. The envelope was opened, imaginary drums rolled, the commended and highly commended articles were announced. I lined up my camera. The winner was an article entitled “But what was he doing in  Ireland?”.  Must be that chap with the Irish ancestors.

It wasn’t. It was me! I had forgotten all about that one.

I stood up to receive my prize. Cameras flashed,  well, one did and someone had the foresight to pick up mine, and take a picture. Champagne flowed – someone later opened the wine box!

And I became a prize winning author.

Shall I add it to the side bar? Winner of the Harry Batchelor Prize, 2017

And 2013, 2011 and 2009 – did I mention I’ve won before? I try not to do it too often – it means I have to act as judge next year!

We would have died that night, if it hadn’t been for the dog.

I’ve come the end of the first phase of editing. Reduced the manuscript from 104,381 to 93,924 losing over 10k words.

Not bad – unfortunately I celebrated by putting some words back. I had removed a scene which I didn’t think mattered. I decided it did matter, so back it went, suitably edited. I then had to get rid of the rubbish I had written to plug the gap. I now have a spare 746 words floating around looking for a home – I wonder if anyone would notice if I deleted them?

I didn’t much like the final chapter. I tried rewriting using a different Point of View, but it was worse.

I’m still not happy with the first chapter, even after the edit, but the first line isn’t bad. That’s it at the top of this post. Do you like it? Does it drag you in? Do you want to read the rest of the book? Don’t worry, it will probably change!

I have put it aside for a while, am having a rest, discovering that another life is happening out there. After several beautiful summer days of refusing to stir from the computer because “I just want to finish this edit.” I was lured out with the promise of a garden visit. A nice drive in the sun down the Fosse Way to Hidcote Manor Gardens. There was no way I would be tempted to think about anything Anglo-Saxon. Would Byrhtnoth have strolled round, inspecting the herbaceous borders or admiring the subtle blends of colour?

Hidcote Gardens, The Red Border

Hidcote Gardens, Fuchsia Garden

Which got me thinking – if he was alive today, what would my protagonist be doing? Probably not a gardener. A soldier seems the obvious choice, but I don’t know. Our heroes nowadays tend to be actors, singers, sportsmen. Some writers have a certain actor in mind – the person to play the character in the film. Chris Hemsworth as Thor has the right look for Byrhtnoth, but I wasn’t sure. Anyway, he’s not tall enough.

Then one day, when I watching some Rugby, I saw him. Richie Gray plays for Scotland (but I won’t hold that against him). He’s the right height 6ft 9in, blond hair, and a Rugby scrum is probably the closest you can come to a shield wall.

One of the known facts about the real Byrhtnoth is that he married a relative of the king. Wasn’t there a Rugby player who married a member of the royal family? And no, my Byrhtnoth doesn’t look like Mike Tindall!

I think I will end the comparison there, because I don’t like to think what the modern equivalent of the Battle of Maldon might be!

Brexit?

(Isn’t it amazing the number of different subjects you can cram in when you’ve got a blog post to fill?)

A Proper Writer?

I am starting to feel like a proper writer. This week was a milestone. Another writer – a proper author, with a proper publisher, contacted me to ask if I would like an advance review copy of his new novella. I mentioned, last week, that I found it convenient to read shorter books to fit in the writing. It was a book that I wanted to read and had already ordered, so of course I said yes.

I have not found time to look at it yet, but look out for my review in a few days. Of course if it’s a load of rubbish, I won’t mention it again. But I’m sure it won’t be.

We had a hard disc failure this week which delayed things. Not the main computer, but an external drive where I keep copies of all my photographs. Luckily everything was backed up elsewhere, but there was a lot of installing a new drive and copying everything back. Not my job, apart from checking everything was back to normal, but it still took up time. No writing was lost!

Another reason for thinking myself a writer, is the fact that the writing is spilling over into real life. Or perhaps my inability to keep it in its place is a sign that I am not a proper writer. Yesterday afternoon I was writing, trying to reach this week’s target. I had to stop to watch the rugby. I hadn’t bothered with the Italy/Ireland match – who would? (Apologies to any Irish or Italian readers) but I had to see the Wales/England match. As I watched, my mind got distracted with what I should have been writing. I was imagining Byrhtnoth swinging an axe, about to kill a really nasty character, when I realised a man in a white shirt was hurtling towards the try line. I shouted. I shouted very loudly. My husband was nearly blown off the sofa! I don’t know where it came from – Byrhtnoth I suppose – he would be an England supporter. Anyway, with his help England beat the nasty little Welsh. (whoops just lost my Welsh readers.)

On this subject, rugby, not the Welsh, I find it useful for finding inspiration for battles. Surely a rugby scrum is the nearest you can get to an Anglo-Saxon shield wall? It also helps with characters. I know what Byrhtnoth looks like. For a long time I searched for a man I could point to and say – that is him – the actor that would play him in the film version, whatever.

I found him on the rugby pitch. Unfortunately he plays for Scotland – not too bad – I support them if they are not playing England.

Richie Gray is the right height (6ft 9in), his hair is bleached rather than natural blond and his eyes, as far as I can tell are not blue, but he has the right physical look.

I’d better go now, the match is about to start.

Finally, word count this week: 5,836 plus 1004 exercise makes 6,840. Not quite 7,000 but near enough.